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ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH, ADRIAN, MI

This article is full of links that will help explain the processes, history, and materials for the windows created for St. Joseph Catholic Church in Adrian, Michigan when they decided to build their new baptistry. Feel free to click onto those links, beginning with this one explaining the use of the baptistry in the Catholic church. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baptistry_%28Pisa%29) An integral part of the design was the windows that surround the building.

The glass chosen was Lamberts Clear Reamy that is a perfect compliment to the marble fountain in the middle of the room. Lamberts Clear Reamy is a mouth blown glass that has beautiful clarity and movement. For a short video showing how this glass is manufactured you can go to the web page listed here. The manufacturer will walk you through the process. Take a look…
http://www.bendheimcabinetglass.com/video/mouthblown.htm

Pictures In Glass ~Stained Glass Studio~ was hired to create the windows. Pat Deere, owner of the studio, and the artist responsible for them, worked with Father Jim Lothamer when picking out materials used and designing the windows. Father Jim was looking to complete the look in the baptistry with a feel of water flowing. A series of 10 windows was constructed using the clear reamy glass and brass came. A close up look of the glass shows the beautiful water like quality of the glass chosen. Each of the windows has a separate theme recognizing different communities within the parish. Important names and dates relevant to each window is sandblasted into the borders.

The original stained glass windows from St. Joseph Catholic Church can be found on the Michigan Stained Glass Website where their windows were featured October, 2005. Click this link to find out more about them. http://museum.msu.edu/museum/msgc/oct05.html . To find out if your church, or other churches in your community are registered with the Michigan Stained Glass censes, click on the following link: http://museum.msu.edu/museum/msgc/msgc_registered/index.htm.

A direct connection to the church can be found by going to the churches web site: http://www.stjosephadrian.com/our-parish.html.

For information about how your church can get questions about church restoration or newly constructed stained glass windows answered, feel free to contact Pat Deere, at Pictures In Glass ~Stained Glass Studio~ at info@picturesinglass.net.


Michigan Glass Month

Each year during the month of April, Michigan is alive with glass exhibits, demonstrations, and competitions for glass artists and enthusiasts alike.

Michigan Glass Month Events: Be sure to watch for the updated calendar for this years activities and events by clicking onto the Michigan Glass Month web site: http://www.michiganglass.org. If the new calendar is not yet up, browse through last years to see what kinds of activities you can expect to enjoy this year.
ST. JOHN LUTHERAN CHURCH, FARMINGTON, MI

By clicking on the parish link shown here, you can see what the church sanctuary looked like prior to the installation of the stained glass windows and compare it to the finished window installation they have now.
http://www.stjohn-lutheran.com/sanctuary.htm .

This project was a little different than most. The artist, Pamela Shapiro, is also a member of the church. It was her design that was chosen to be created in stained glass by Pictures In Glass, Stained Glass Studio in Tecumseh. There are 12 fish hidden in the lines of the design that represent the twelve apostles of Christ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve_Apostles) The sun rays are overlaid onto the leaded glass.

The glass used for this project was primarily Youghiogheny Stipple Glass. Samples of the glass can be found by clicking on the link shown here: http://www.youghioghenyglass.com/stainedglass/stippleglass1.htm and watching glassmakers in the process can be seen by clicking on the link shown here: http://www.youghioghenyglass.com/oceana/oceanaphotos1.htm. This glass was chosen because of its ability to look so beautifully different when lit from in front, from behind, with natural light, or artificial lighting.

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